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Our Story

How Whiskey Teller in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia Came To Be

Raised between January and December of 1884 by John B. Mills, a Member of Parliament, our home initially accommodated the Bank of Nova Scotia and law offices. Facing the busy railway and dock yard, with the post office and customs house as a neighbour, this was the busiest area of the town of Annapolis Royal.

After the Bank relocated to a larger facility in 1930, the Liquor Commission opened its doors to greet thirsty travelers as they bustled around town.

The Whiskey Teller Building in 1900

The first Bank of Nova Scotia building was erected on Church Street by John B. Mills in 1884. This photo was taken in 1900.

Photo courtesy of Annapolis Heritage Society.

Merchants of Church Street in 1885

Merchants of Church Street gathered in front of John L. Clark’s Grocery Store on the corner of Church and St George Street, 1885.

Photo courtesy of Annapolis Heritage Society.

Shortly after the Liquor Commission relocated in 1966, a Bakery was opened by Greg Kerr and his family, who still reside in the area today. The building continued to be used for commercial purposes for businesses such as a book store and youth hostel.

Many fires ravaged the business district of Annapolis Royal in the early 1900s, this being one of the few buildings of its age that are left. In 1982 it was declared a Heritage Property by the Town of Annapolis Royal, as this area of town began to see revitalization.

Whiskey Teller Building 1900

The first Bank of Nova Scotia building was erected on Church Street by John B. Mills in 1884. This photo was taken in 1900.

Photo courtesy of Annapolis Heritage Society.

Raised between January and December of 1884 by John B. Mills, a Member of Parliament, our home initially accommodated the Bank of Nova Scotia and law offices. Facing the busy railway and dock yard, with the post office and customs house as a neighbour, this was the busiest area of the town of Annapolis Royal.

After the Bank relocated to a larger facility in 1930, the Liquor Commission opened its doors to greet thirsty travelers as they bustled around town.

Merchants of Church Street in 1885

Merchants of Church Street gathered in front of John L. Clark’s Grocery Store on the corner of Church and St George Street, 1885.

Photo courtesy of Annapolis Heritage Society.

Shortly after the Liquor Commission relocated in 1966, a Bakery was opened by Greg Kerr and his family, who still reside in the area today. The building continued to be used for commercial purposes for businesses such as a book store and youth hostel.

Many fires ravaged the business district of Annapolis Royal in the early 1900s, this being one of the few buildings of its age that are left. In 1982 it was declared a Heritage Property by the Town of Annapolis Royal, as this area of town began to see revitalization.

Shortly after, the building then welcomed its first free house – Ye Ole Town Pub. The business welcomed patrons over the course of almost 40 years, with different owners leaving their everlasting mark on the business.

Proud to be the next in line, we are reimaging the concept and restoring the building’s features to their former glory. Exposed original brick walls, and 18-foot ceilings grace our main sitting room. Rich hardwood floors lead you back to our open concept kitchen where you can sit at our intimate chef’s table. Take in the cozy atmosphere as our Head Chef, Zachary Blease, works our custom-built wood fired rotisserie that he feeds with apple and birch wood to create perfectly roasted chicken and ribs.

Shortly after, the building then welcomed its first free house – Ye Ole Town Pub. The business welcomed patrons over the course of almost 40 years, with different owners leaving their everlasting mark on the business.

Proud to be the next in line, we are reimaging the concept and restoring the building’s features to their former glory. Exposed original brick walls, and 18-foot ceilings grace our main sitting room. Rich hardwood floors lead you back to our open concept kitchen where you can sit at our intimate chef’s table. Take in the cozy atmosphere as our Head Chef, Zachary Blease, works our custom-built wood fired rotisserie that he feeds with apple and birch wood to create perfectly roasted chicken and ribs.

The Second Floor

The early 1900s vibe carried throughout the building leads you upstairs, to our lounge known as The Second Floor. During the era in which the building housed Ye Old Town Pub, to get upstairs you would have to enter through a secret doorway. 

Building codes no longer allow for the surreptitious entrance, but we’ve aimed to keep that “speakeasy” atmosphere. Upstairs you can relax, engage in a game of billiards or darts, or take in a live performance from one of our local musicians.

We’ve used pieces of the past in the redesign of this historic property. From our name to our décor and atmosphere we intend to pay homage to those who came before us.

Taxi Service in 1900

The Hillsdale House Taxi Service in 1900, with Bill Perkins and his horses Maud and Gyp. The rig was use to passenger guests from his parents’ hotel to the waterfront or railway station.

Photo courtesy of Annapolis Heritage Society.

Decoration
The Second Floor

The early 1900s vibe carried throughout the building leads you upstairs, to our lounge known as The Second Floor. During the era in which the building housed Ye Old Town Pub, to get upstairs you would have to enter through a secret doorway.

Building codes no longer allow for the surreptitious entrance, but we’ve aimed to keep that “speakeasy” atmosphere. Upstairs you can relax, engage in a game of billiards or darts, or take in a live performance from one of our local musicians.

We’ve used pieces of the past in the redesign of this historic property. From our name to our décor and atmosphere we intend to pay homage to those who came before us.

Taxi Service in 1900

The Hillsdale House Taxi Service in 1900, with Bill Perkins and his horses Maud and Gyp. The rig was use to passenger guests from his parents’ hotel to the waterfront or railway station.

Photo courtesy of Annapolis Heritage Society.